5.12.11

DIY: Hem Jeans Fast & Easy



Copyright-All Rights Reserved

Update - Click here for the video tutorial

Loving my slippers this Winter.
Anyway....


We short people find it hard to buy jeans that fit us length wise. I bought some jeans from Buckle and they hemmed them for free for me leaving the original hem on the jeans. I picked them up, took them home, looked closer at the hem and I thought to myself, "I could have done that." A couple years went by and I did nothing about all my long jeans, until today. Cathe, from Just Something I Made, put up a tutorial on her blog and I was so happy to see it! The thing is...I did mine just slightly different. Watch.


I did just what she said; put the jeans on, find where you want your jeans to lay and pin it. Roll the jeans up so that the original hem is slightly above that mark, and pin it.

Sew right next to the original hem, like so.

Here is where I do my thing. Instead of leaving that extra chunk of fabric rolled up and tacked down on the inside of the jean, I just cut it off. There's a lot less bulk which is good when you have skinny jeans. Plus, I think that is how the hemming lady does it at Buckle.




Unroll it and iron flat.
That's it! This seriously took me maybe 15 minutes to do and it was so worth it! Best part is that I didn't have to pay anyone to do it for me.

*Update- I just made the blog post Tips on Hemming Pants With the Original Hem. Lot's of great advice from all you wonderful people out there!

*UPDATE - We now have a video tutorial so click here to watch!


Much better.


Stephanie


p.s.  Check out Meg's tip on making old jeans into shorts using this awesome tutorial!

389 comments:

  1. i've done this to a few pairs of my own. best way to hem jeans!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I was seriously JUST telling my husband that I wish I knew how to hem jeans..I might give it a try...Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  3. OMG, you are brilliant!!! I am short person, and so I have a couple of pairs that need altering - as usual - and I was going to send them out for that.

    Now I don't need to!!! Yay!

    Thank you so much for sharing :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm loving your slippers too! :) Where'd you get them? (Or did you make them?)

    Does it fray where you cut off the extra fabric?

    ReplyDelete
  5. OH MY GOSH! Why didn't I think of that? So easy...thanks for sharing! xo

    ReplyDelete
  6. Holy Guacamole! This is genius. I'm the official jeans-hemmer in my family and now I can do it quicker and without that " I hemmed these myself look"!!

    ReplyDelete
  7. My slippers are from Target, last year though. But I've been thinking I could make them and share it with you all :) So, the jeans fray slightly, but not enough for me to worry about. Good luck with your hemming!

    ReplyDelete
  8. do you think this would work for my husband's khaki pants that have a cuff at the bottom. i really need sewing for dummies so if you want to do a tutorial for that kind too, that would be great!!

    ReplyDelete
  9. omg!!! that is great!!! thanks for sharing!!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Do you stitch by hand or use a machine?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW THAT TO.HOW DO YOU SEW IT?

      Delete
  11. I'm curious - does having that extra seam there make the hem flip up after a while? My regular jeans' hems flip up all the time and I'm certainly not about to iron my jeans! But mostly I do need to hem jeans because I'm short, so was curious about the flip factor.

    ReplyDelete
  12. If you don't want them to fray.... go around with zig zag.....

    ReplyDelete
  13. To keep them from flipping ... Tack the sides of the extra up inside the jeans ... just on the sides. it will help hold them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ...tack the sides UP not down...

      Delete
    2. ...to reiterate... it's important to tack the sides UP to keep them from flipping... and sometimes you may need to tack a spot in the front and/or back as well....

      Delete
  14. What do you mean go around with zig zag? I am about do this for my husband. While I am happy to iron the jeans after sewing, I don't want to have to iron his jeans all of the time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just use a Zigzag stitch around the hem where you have cut so it won't fray.

      Delete
    2. You could also use Fray Check - a liquid that dries clear. I don't think you'd need it though.

      Delete
  15. Really great idea! I can't tell you how many jeans I have hemmed and NOT done this! DANG - so will be using this from now on! My machine will really be happy NOT to be sewing all those thicknesses also! : )

    ReplyDelete
  16. Use a zig zag... I think she means to use pinking shears to cut off the extra fabric. These are the scissors that make the zig zag shape that keeps fabric from fraying.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're talking about "pinking shears" - a totally different thing from zig-zag, which is a stitch created by using a zig-zag foot on a sewing machine. The size of the zig-zag stitch can be controlled by the stitch length/width adjustment on the control panel of the sewing machine. Pinking Shears "cut" a pointed shape into fabric that makes the fabric more difficult to fray. This is done before ever going to the machine to sew.

      Delete
    2. No, I believe she meant the zig-zag stitch on the sewing machine

      Delete
    3. you could also use a serger machine ,instead of zig-zag ...and it will cut your unwanted hem at the same time...but really cool idea ...going to have to try this...

      Delete
    4. I would use a slight zig zag stitch on the sewing machine, also if you flip the jeans down and sew a top stitch - which means sewing around the bottom through all the layers just above the seam you already made- will hold them down and prevent fraying. Great idea.

      Delete
  17. Zig zag means use the zig zag stitch on the sewing machine...

    ReplyDelete
  18. I'm not understanding the cutting process, does it not not cut the jeans?

    ReplyDelete
  19. Genius! I'll need to do that instead of my uneven attempts at sewing a straight new hem.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Thank you so much! Being a short person myself, this is a very useful tutorial.

    ReplyDelete
  21. To prevent fraying, after you cut off the excess material, use the zig zag stitch on your machine and go over the edges before you flip it down and iron flat. Make sure to iron the zig zagged edge up, towards the waist, so the seam will lay flat.

    ReplyDelete
  22. You could also use a surger and it'll cut the fabric off for you and make a nice edge that wont frey.

    ReplyDelete
  23. i would've never thought of doing that. that's cool.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I am so going to do this. What a great idea. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  25. I am so excited about this technique. I cant wait to try it!! Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  26. I do designer jean home parties and can't wait to be able to offer on-site hemming at my parties! I have so many customers that need them hemmed.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Just a note that the easiest way to do the stitching so close to the hem is to use a zipper foot. I didn't see it mentioned so thought I would add it. I have been hemming jeans for YEARS and never thought of doing it that way!! What a great idea, thanks!!

    ReplyDelete
  28. Just some advice: I hemmed some pants this way, but I didn't cut the fabric off yet because I wanted to test the length and decide if it was right. Boy am I glad I waited! With tennis shoes my pants were perfect, but I wore boots with a heel today and they were WAY too short! I looked ridiculous! I am just going to take out my stitches and re hem it. So don't be too hasty to cut the fabric off. Wait until it is the perfect length for sure.

    ReplyDelete
  29. There is also a wonderful product called Fray Check that you can get from the sewing section that will keep your seams from fraying. It works great.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Saw this on pinterest and I will have to keep this in mind - at 5'2" too long jeans is always a problem

    ReplyDelete
  31. OMG! Thank you, at 4'11 I have always had to alter my pants...never keeping the original hem, I love it.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Wow!! How super easy is that!! I wish I knew that long ago!!

    ReplyDelete
  33. I work at a alteration shop and this hem is a hollywood hem

    ReplyDelete
  34. I do this with really strong fabric glue since I can't sew. You still fold and iron, but you have to let them sit for a day before wearing or washing. Works like a charm, if you get the right glue then it lasts YEARS.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Thank you for this!! I have 4 pairs of jeans that have been sitting by the door waiting for me to take them to my tailor to be hemmed. I can so do this myself!

    ReplyDelete
  36. So, do you just leave the pins in then?

    ReplyDelete
  37. Can this be done with any type pant such as black dress pants? Also, In order to keep the bottom from flipping up, is it better to leave the extra on and maybe sew it up the side hem so that it doesnt fall down? Or cut off the extra? I dont want to be ironing either!! But this looks easy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had the same question and wondered if anyone ever answered you.

      Delete
  38. Dear Anonymous...please don't leave the pins in :)

    ReplyDelete
  39. I know this works with straight-leg jeans because I've done it, but was thinking it might not work so well with flares as the bottom hem would be wider than the circumference of the site you'd want the new hem, depending on how much of a hem you needed. Just a thought.

    ReplyDelete
  40. to avoid the fraying, run a small zig zag stitch over the selveged edge before you fold inside & iron.

    ReplyDelete
  41. to avoid the fraying, run a small zig zag stitch over the selveged edge before you fold inside & iron.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can also use a product called Fraycheck to avoid fraying edges. Apply liquid and let dry before wearing or washing.

      Delete
    2. You can also use Fraycheck, a liquid you apply and let dry before washing or wearing.

      Delete
  42. FANTASTIC! Why didn't I think of that? Being a shortie,I've hemmed up many a pair of jeans, but leaving the factory hem looks so much better. Thanks for the hint.

    ReplyDelete
  43. I've done this before and it works great but once you wash them they do fray alot so just be warned. You'll have to constantly trim the fraying. Unless u can think of a solution to keep them from fraying.

    ReplyDelete
  44. I am a seamstress who hems Jeans for the Buckle stores, the hem your referring too is called a Euro Hem, the actually process is very simple, it works best for jeans and pants that have a visible hem, not an invisible one like on dress pants. You mark the desired length on your pants cut at that length then take the remaining length and cut 1/2inch to 3/4 of a inch above the original hem, take the original hem piece and sew it back onto the pants, seeing very close to the original hem, then to reduce fraying, I machine serge the edge, then flip the new hem down and on the right side of the fabric, top stitch very close to the hem again, this keeps it from rolling back up. Happy sewing!!

    ReplyDelete
  45. oh wow, this is so awesome to know, thankyou so much! I will be hemming my own jeans from now on <3

    ReplyDelete
  46. You can either use pinking shears on the cut to keep it from fraying or get a bottle of fray check and that will hold all the ends in place and it stands up through the wash.

    ReplyDelete
  47. thank you so much. i just finished up and no kidding, it took all of 10 minutes. after the final press, even i have a hard time seeing that i altered my jeans. brilliant. thanks again. katharine

    ReplyDelete
  48. LOVE, LOVE, LOVE this idea!! I am soooo tired of wearing capris (which are too short for long pants) & rolling up jeans!!! At 4' 9" with a 28" inseam it is nearly impossible to find any kind of pants that fit, even petites. Thanks for sharing it is much appreciated!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  49. just a comment about the fray check. Be careful not to drip in the fabric where you don't want it. It will not come out. It does work well though

    ReplyDelete
  50. I hope you end up making those slippers! They're absolutely adorable.

    ReplyDelete
  51. This is Great! I havce a pair of my granddaughter's new jeans to hem. We were going to lose a cute edge on the hem....I'm doing this!!!

    ReplyDelete
  52. It is great... but... you also need to use a serger to bind the seam or the jeans start fraying and... if the bottom of the leg is wider than what you trimmed off you need to change that measurement too. Good luck! I have been doing this hem for a few years now and it looks wonderful when you do it right, measure correctly, etc. I charge $15 for that job, many out there charge up to $35.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Has anyone thought of maybe using a hemming fabric? I know this is not the actual word for the product, but I know that it is used on hems around skirts and also for fabrics that may fray easily. It kinda looks like ribbon. you would sandwich it together where the new seam is (that everyone is worrying about fraying)sew around the pant leg again and voila...no fraying. You can then hand sew a few stitches through the "ribbon" into the corners of the jeans after ironing the seam into place. You could also try stitch witchery which would literally bind the new seam to the jean on the inside, hence, no fraying...

      Delete
    2. It's called bias tape, I believe.

      Delete
  53. I use this technique but I follow it with a topstitch just above the seam with a matching threat. It tends to flatten the seam then you don't have to serge to bind~just don't cut too close to the seam. Actually I rarely cut off the excess, just incase I need to lengthen them again...or sell them.

    ReplyDelete
  54. Thank you so much for this!! I can never find pants that are the right length. If I buy the regulars they are way too long and if I buy the shorts they're always just a little too short. Can't wait to try this.

    ReplyDelete
  55. Oh my Gosh, why didn't I think of this!!! My sewing machine will not hem jeans as the material is too thick. I will try this the next time I need to hem jeans. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  56. Ack, this is genius!!! I always do it the long way (cutting off and re-hemming). Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!

    ReplyDelete
  57. So could you please give us some tips on Hemming flare Jeans please. I have 3 pairs waiting.Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  58. So could you please give us some tips on Hemming flare Jeans please. I have 3 pairs waiting.Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  59. I just used this technique to turn capris into shorts. It worked great! Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  60. I have four pairs of jeans in the car right now that I was going to take to the cleaners to have hemmed. I'm going to go get them now.

    ReplyDelete
  61. I'm a tall person and am thinking when my jeans get too short...hem into capri's

    ReplyDelete
  62. I love the hemming idea because I too am short. And from the tall person, another good idea is making your favorite jeans into capris....

    ReplyDelete
  63. Think I need a Video tell you better after I try it. Is there a video ?
    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  64. This is really cool. Now if only there err a quick and easy way to lengthen too short jeans for us tall people. =)

    ReplyDelete
  65. cool idea ;)

    xx
    dahi

    http://strangenessandcharms.blogspot.de/

    ReplyDelete
  66. This is a great idea! Been hemming jeans for ever and never heard of this, so THANKS!!! One suggestion tho - please make sure to wash the jeans or make sure they're pre-shrunk before you do this, or they may end up too short! Thanks, again!

    ReplyDelete
  67. Thank You At 5'1 this is invaluable!!!

    ReplyDelete
  68. What an awesome idea that I cannot wait to try!! Hey, Nicole O who posted earlier, contact me about the designer jean home party please. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  69. I tried this but it didn't look quite right. See in your close up with the iron? The fabric pattern doesn't continue perfectly. Not a big deal in most jeans but it looked obvious on mine. I thought it was just me. But then every time I was them the bottom flips up?! What did I do wrong? It won't stay like when I iron it.

    ReplyDelete
  70. typo....should have said every time I WASH them...

    ReplyDelete
  71. many thanks i do and it's very very good!!
    Many thanks!!

    ReplyDelete
  72. I must be seriously blonde cuz I don't get it. If you cut off the material then what? you sew back on the hem? Is it already there? I don't get it.

    ReplyDelete
  73. I had to pay $46 in order to have my jeans hemmed like this. My jeans cost $40. Thanks for posting this.

    Sue

    ReplyDelete
  74. wish i knew this a long time ago

    ReplyDelete
  75. this doesn't work with flared jeans and if your picky on the way you like for your jeans to look you wont like to have a seam above the hem and if you don't do something with the jean material where you cut it like fray check or zig zag or serge the edge it will fray and come apart.
    I did a couple of pairs and i didnt like the way the seam looked that is above the hem seam after a few months.

    ReplyDelete
  76. Great Idea! I tried it, and it made sure it was at the right length, it was perfect! When I sewed,cut and iron, I tried them on and was in shock that it was WAYYY higher then should have been, about a good 3-4 inches. What gone wrong? I hate wasting a perfectly good, cozy pair of jeans. Any help?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sounds like you turned up the leg until you got to the pin marking the length you wanted. when you did that the original hem would have been a lot further up the leg. When you sew around the original hem in was in the wrong place. If you put the original hem just ABOVE where you put you pins marking where you want the length to be you will be at the right place.

      Delete
    2. Sounds like you turned up the leg until you got to the pin marking the length you wanted. when you did that the original hem would have been a lot further up the leg. When you sew around the original hem in was in the wrong place. If you put the original hem just ABOVE where you put you pins marking where you want the length to be you will be at the right place.

      Delete
  77. This is awesome! I have never thought it could be done this way. But yes, that's just obvious. I'm thinking if this could work on other sort of pants too...

    ReplyDelete
  78. this is awesomeness..at 5'2", i am so sick of my pants looking like they were hemmed..and i usually end up hemming all my pants..no matter how well you can hem, you know as well as i do, they have "that look"..now they will look amazing! THANK YOU!!!

    ReplyDelete
  79. i would love to do this...but the pictures aren't doing it for me. i wish you could do a youtube demonstration. a visual is so much better for me anyway. at 9.00 a pop to hem, this would save me a ton of money...

    ReplyDelete
  80. Short people all over the world are thanking you!!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  81. Stephanie - Thank you soooo much! I'm one of those people that is all torso/no legs and even though I'm 5'6", I have to buy petite jeans and they are STILL too long. Arrgh!


    For the people who asked for a video, I found this on youtube. It was very helpful.

    http://youtu.be/HSRD2qAfRF0

    ReplyDelete
  82. Think I'll pick up a few pairs at the Goodwill and practice before I tackle a new pair of jeans. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  83. What a brilliant idea! I'm quite short and always have to shorten my jeans when I buy them. Will definitely try this method in future. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  84. This method works with sweat pants too. When my son was age 8-12, he was stocky. It was impossible to find pants that fit. I used this method to convert men's-small-sized sweat pants into pants he could wear.

    ReplyDelete
  85. Thank you for this awesome tip! Just tried it on a pair that was way too long but great otherwise!

    ReplyDelete
  86. You are amazing! Thanks so much!
    So simple so effective!

    ReplyDelete
  87. Yep this looks amazingly easy! I just bought some jeans that are to long as usual lol. I am definitely going to give this a shot. Thank you! :-)

    ReplyDelete
  88. I have been sewing for nearly 60 years! I can't tell you how many pairs of jeans I have shortened over the years for myself and others - this is a terrific idea. Thanks a million.

    ReplyDelete
  89. Great idea, but if you want to wear heals, you ought to leave the pants long. This pic you show looks riduculous.

    ReplyDelete
  90. I would at least do a zig zag to stop them from fraying or use the new no fray glue, and last but not least is that edging stuff.

    ReplyDelete
  91. Thanks for sharing...will definitely give this a try!

    ReplyDelete
  92. If you use pinking shears to make the cut, there will be less fraying.

    ReplyDelete
  93. I have done that with the hems but I serge the edges after cutting them off so that they don't fray.

    ReplyDelete
  94. I have been sewing for about 60 years and this is the first time I have seen this method and I LOVE it!!. Cannot wait to try it. Thank you, thank you, thank you!!

    ReplyDelete
  95. I am a short novice here... Can you explain how and where to do that extra to keep it from rolling up

    ReplyDelete
  96. OMG! I'm SO doing this! Thanks :)

    ReplyDelete
  97. Hi, Why hav I never thougt of that way to make the right lenght on thebones. I'm 158 cm tall and I always have to do this staff.

    ReplyDelete
  98. I have been sewing for years and have never thought of that. What an amazing time saving trick. Love Love Love it.

    ReplyDelete
  99. I would never hem this way, tacky.

    ReplyDelete
  100. I think you did a fabulous job! What a wonderful way to hem jeans. I have ten pair to hem for a friends little girl. Thanks so much for the tutorial. Nice close up pics too.

    ReplyDelete
  101. Amazing! I would have recreated my own hem. I have so many jeans I should shorten I'm going to try this...Thanks for sharing!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  102. I love this idea!! I'm confused on cutting the extra off of it! Could u please post a video of u doing it. I can be a little blonde at times. Lol

    ReplyDelete
  103. Its really not that hard to measure where you want your finished length and add 1 & 1/4 inches, cut off the original hem and turn the raw edge under 1/4 inch and another 1/2 inch and sew it on the sewing machine using a color thread that matches the rest of your top stitching. I'd rather do that than worry about that original hem flipping up.

    ReplyDelete
  104. This really is a great tutorial and an easy way to hem jeans quickly. I just tried it after coming here from Pinterest and I have a couple recommendations:
    A) Use a 16 denim needle and some denim thread - I've broken too many regular sewing needles working with denim.
    B) I'm so glad someone suggested using the zipper foot on your machine when doing this. It helped tremendously and kept my seem nice and straight.
    Otherwise, great tutorial. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  105. Going to do this!
    goodtobeathome.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  106. Seriously the most stupid pin on here. Fabric stores sell the jeans thread. Cut them off an inch longer than you want them, fold up a half inch and fold again. Top stitch with the jeans thread. Seriously stupid, I hate to see this one!

    ReplyDelete
  107. From one short person to another: thank you, thank you, thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  108. That is a genius idea!!!

    ReplyDelete
  109. Super - thank you! There is one brand of jeans I love but they only come in a 34" length which is super long, even on me at 5'8"!

    ReplyDelete
  110. Awesome! Thanks! And I looove your slippers? Where did you buy them? Or if you crocheted them, can you please post the pattern? :)

    ReplyDelete
  111. For the person who made the negative comments... not nice!! Love this and thank you, Stephanie!!

    ReplyDelete
  112. I use a zipper foot on my machine so you can get real close to the original hem.

    ReplyDelete
  113. I tried this, but the hem was way too bulky on the side seams. Would not lay down. Plus it would have frayed out eventually.Great Idea, but maybe not for thick denim jeans. I did it the old fashioned way.

    ReplyDelete
  114. Oh, really cool was it! I am trying for my sister's jeans and hope it will be work as good as yours :)

    ReplyDelete
  115. Awesome! My daughter recently was given 3 black garbage bags full of designer jeans but they're all too long. You saved me so much money because I can hem them myself now and she can't complain. Lol Any tips for boot cut jeans though? Thanks again!

    ReplyDelete
  116. Another great idea i will do this soon as I am loving it! coupon codes

    ReplyDelete
  117. NICE!! No matter what jeans I buy they are ALWAYS too long! I have been rolling them up or under forever because I don't want to pay someone $20 to hem them for me, but I want the 'professional' hemmed look. NOW I CAN DO IT ON MY OWN!!! THANK YOU!!

    ReplyDelete
  118. Wish I had seen this before paying a ton to get my jeans hemmed! And I LOVE the length with the heels. A lot of fashionistas are wearing jeans that way. (With heels that cute, it would be a shame to cover them up!) :-)

    ReplyDelete
  119. I have been sewing for almost 50 years....darn girl you are smart....I have cut them off and redid the hem this is so freaking easy....I don't know how I stumbled upon you but your are BRILLIANT

    ReplyDelete
  120. I have to go to a party and i was able to hem my jeans just in time!
    Thank you so much for making this!

    ReplyDelete
  121. I like your idea of reducing the bulk. I'm doing it to two pairs of jeans today that I've just had sitting, needing to be shortened. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  122. I am doing this today to two pairs of jeans that have been sitting, waiting. Thanks for the idea. I like reducing the bulk too! I'm sure not going to grow.

    ReplyDelete
  123. there's another blogger on the web that shows you this trick and tells you to finish off that cut off piece by doing a zig zag stitch.. also you can take up to an inch off at your knee, just right in the knee bend area if your pants flare:)

    ReplyDelete
  124. I had no idea so many people took their jeans to be hemmed, I'm glad I have a machine that will handle denim, so hemming has never been an issue. Also, to the person asking about dress pants. They are hemmed with an invisible hem, do NOT try this with your dress pants!

    ReplyDelete
  125. Wow. That looks so easy. Thanks a lot for the info.

    ReplyDelete
  126. Brilliant tutorial! Thanks! So professional looking. At 5'0 it's so hard to find jeans short enough for me, this helps out A LOT!

    ReplyDelete
  127. OMG are you kidding me???!!!! I can not believe how easy that is!!! I'm 53 years young now and HATE "cuffing" my jeans!! It looks ridiculous on a woman my age. Thanks sooooooo much for sharing!!!
    Let's see, how many pairs do I have to hem? Who cares, it's sooo easy!!!

    :O

    ReplyDelete
  128. For a woman at 5'3" I am too tall for petite but too short for regular.. this shall save me. No more hiking up my pants on a rainy day so they don't drag along the wet pavement and give me wet pants all day. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  129. Just a suggestion: try to wash and dry your jeans a few times before you cut any length off. I have found that pants I hem to the right length seem to be too short after a while. I let my pants shrink up a little before I sew a permanent hem. I just make do with rolling or safety pins until then.

    ReplyDelete
  130. Now I'm sitting here and wondering why I couldn't have come up with this idea sometime in the past, oh, 37 years since I stopped growing. Awesome!

    ReplyDelete
  131. Thanks a lot for posting this genius idea! A quick question. Did you use a sewing machine? I don't have one but I have pretty good sewing skill. If you did use a sewing machine, you think it'd look awkward when it's hand-stitched?

    ReplyDelete
  132. Its an easy way to hem the jeans, thanks for sharing with us. I would also try the same tip.

    Branded Jeans

    ReplyDelete
  133. Warning: when cutting off the extra chunk of fabric, be careful not to cut what you just sewed, cut it close to the seam, but not too close! ;)

    ReplyDelete
  134. Warning: when cutting off the extra chunk of fabric, be careful not to cut what you just sewed, cut it close to the seam, but not too close! ;)

    ReplyDelete
  135. Thank you for posting this! I was able to hem 3 pairs of my wife's jeans for her, and she loves them! I'm like her personal taylor. lol -Richard

    ReplyDelete
  136. so basically, you're my hero. this is BRILLIANT! thanks so much. :)

    ReplyDelete
  137. FABULOUS! i'M 5FT4 AND MY 18 YEAR OLD DAUGHTER IF 5FT, SO LOTS OF ALTERING OF CLOTHES NEEDED IN OUR HOUSE. THANKS FOR SHARING CXX

    ReplyDelete
  138. Did that in the 60's and 70's. Only thing is they unravel after time.

    ReplyDelete
  139. great, post thanks for sharing .Iam also short and have lots of jeansthat are to long going to try this Thank you :)

    ReplyDelete
  140. OMG....I have been sewing for years and have never seen anything like this. It is completely genius. Like all other short people, I would have to hem my jeans without the original hem intact and I always thought it looked so tacky. Not anymore...thank you for sharing this fab idea. Definitely sharing this with my short friends who pay for hemming.

    ReplyDelete
  141. Trying. To figure out how this is easier or quicker than cutting them an inch longer double fold hem?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. so much easier than a double fold and those diy hems in jeans never look like the original!

      Delete
  142. Thats awsome! I know a lady who pays fifty bucks for jeans and then twenty to hem them. If I could get people to pay that much for me to hem their jeans I could make quite a tidy profit!

    ReplyDelete
  143. You could do this with a serger and not have to cut it or worry about fraying. Awesome idea!

    ReplyDelete
  144. I've got so many pants to do this too! Thanks! Us 5'1" girls need to stick together. :P Just bought a pair of $8.49 clearance jeans at Old Navy and even though they are "short" length, they are WAAAY too long.

    ReplyDelete
  145. Can this be done without a sewing machine, though?

    ReplyDelete
  146. going to be trying this in the near future...

    ReplyDelete
  147. This is so great! I have lots of pants that need hemming. This will make all of them look like they came at the right length. Thank you so much for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  148. Thanks for sharing you knowledge. I have several pair that need hemming. Now I am going to get busy and hem them. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  149. I think this can be done without sewing machine. You will just have to make sure your hand sewing is very tight so it won't come off, but it seems like it would work.

    ReplyDelete
  150. In regards to the question about fraying.......run a zig zag stitch along the raw edge one you have cut the excess off. This will help control graying.

    ReplyDelete
  151. Awesome!!!! In 45 yrs. of sewing, I never thought of this!! I will use it, thanks!!! So happy!!!

    ReplyDelete
  152. I have a "Husky" young Grandson, who will now have perfect fitting Jeans from here on out. Thank You So Much!

    ReplyDelete
  153. I have a "Husky" young Grandson, who will have perfect fitting Jeans from here on out! Thanks so much.

    ReplyDelete
  154. Only being 4' 7" I thank you for this!! I hate having pants that I walk on all the time!!

    ReplyDelete
  155. There is a great product called Fraycheck (sp?) you can use to prevent fraying on any pants fabtic. It's liquid. You just fab it along the edge & let dry. I've been using it it for years.

    ReplyDelete
  156. I am definitely going to do this next time. Much easier than measuring, cutting, folding, pinning and hoping the needle doesn't break going through all the layers at the seams. And great idea about waiting to cut the extra fabric off until you're sure about the length. You might also want to wash them a few times before cutting. Thanks for the great DYI.

    ReplyDelete
  157. All my years of sewing and I never thought of this simple trick, thanks for posting.

    ReplyDelete
  158. If you pin where you want the finished length to be, and then fold the original hem to just above that mark and sew right beside it, won[t that make the finished length longer by the length of the original hem (like 1/2" or so)?

    ReplyDelete
  159. When measuring your hem, would you make the adjustment, 1/2 or a less, for the hem in place?

    ReplyDelete
  160. AWESOME! and you can use all those cut off pieces for a jean bag! piece them together and make a re-usable tote! :D whooo hoooo!

    ReplyDelete
  161. If you still want to cut, fold and sew your hem then try beating the heck out of the thick side seams. Fold up the first time and beat the seam with a hammer then fold up the final time and beat again. This softens and flattens the seam so that it is much easier to sew through. You may still need to hand walk the needle through the thick fabric but it should be much easier to get through after you have beat it to death. :)

    ReplyDelete
  162. Has anyone tried this method with yoga pants? I teach P.E. and all my yoga pants are too long.

    ReplyDelete
  163. Why not make your first stitching a basting stitch, try them on for fit, then flip it and do a final top stitching that would help hold everything in place. I like the idea of serging the edge, too - just to keep everything neat and tidy. Thanks for the tutorial - hemming pants has always been a chore and I have one pair that have been laying on my sewing table for a year - because I have been putting it off. Now I will try this and see how it all works out. :)

    ReplyDelete
  164. OK...I just don't see how this saves time over traditional hemming. And if done traditionally, there's no fraying. You still have to cut and sew, right? But on the other hand, it does show people that you can hem your own jeans and save $. Hemming isn't that difficult...even done the traditional way. So either way, do it yourself and keep the money you save in the pocket of those jeans.

    ReplyDelete
  165. Thank you! I'm short and unless I can find jeans in petite sizes, they are too long and I have to hem them. This will save so much time (and broken sewing machine needles!).

    ReplyDelete
  166. Thanks you - this will save me so much time and broken sewing machine needles.

    ReplyDelete
  167. This is a great way to hem your jeans, but I want to add with all the others you risk fraying with such a small seam. Yes, a zig zag or serged edge will help. I would suggest that you leave a little more fabric when you cut close to the stitching and when you turn it under to press you can top stitch the new seam down in place and it also holds the edge of your jeans down to prevent the turning up that often occurs with jeans because of the heavy hem.

    ReplyDelete
  168. My husband and I have been married 32 years, and the fact that his jeans sit for months (OK, maybe years) before being hemmed has always been an issue. As a "retired" Home Economics (including sewing) teacher, I have still struggled with hemming his many, many pairs of jeans. Yes, he's "height challenged". And I'm "jeans hemming challenged". Not a good combo. So - thanks for ironing out one of the few wrinkles in our matrimonial fabric!

    ReplyDelete
  169. I would use fray check to ensure it doesn't fray.

    ReplyDelete
  170. Someone mentioned using glue rather than sewing. Can you recommend a brand of glue that would be really good for this and does this also work on corduroy pants?

    ReplyDelete
  171. Oh sure, I just sewed the pant legs shut! LOL!

    ReplyDelete
  172. I just did this today, and it is awesome! I always put off hemming pants because it's just such a pain! So easy!!

    ReplyDelete
  173. I L O V E T H I S ! ! I hate the "new" look of how I hem jeans, so I just walk on my jeans all the time, and so does my husband. I'm going to go round up all our pants now, thank you very much!

    ReplyDelete